CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: The Ashgate Research Companion to Community Development

Abstracts due by 29th May 2015

Edited by Dr Lynda Shevellar and Dr Peter Westoby of The University of Queensland, Australia, the aim of the (provisionally titled) Ashgate Research Companion to Community Development is to provide scholars and graduate students with a comprehensive and authoritative state-of-the-art review of the current research in this subject.

As a topic, it is particularly attractive owing to its inter-disciplinary nature. In addition to community development scholars, the work will appeal to graduates and academics working within the fields of social work, sociology, political science, and development studies. The research companion will be aimed towards the academic library market. Authors will be drawn from around the world, with their writing receiving assistance from an international peer review panel, including Emeritus Professor Marjorie Mayo, Emeritus
Professor Jim Ife, Associate Professor James DeFilippis and Dr Akwugo Emejulu.

The process

Abstracts of 500 words are due by 29th May 2015. All authors will be notified of the final decision by 31st August 2015. Selected authors will then be invited to contribute a full chapter of 6,500 words, due March 2016. Chapters will undergo a peer review process with senior scholars in community development, to assist in the further development of writing.

The final manuscript will be delivered to Ashgate in February 2017, for publication and release in 2017.

What we are seeking

Abstracts are now being sought for book chapters from authors undertaking
community development research in any of the following areas:

  • Populations facing forced displacement such as asylum seekers, refugees and
    people enduring development induced displacement
  • Social development in post-conflict or transition communities
  • Violence in a domestic sphere such as domestic violence and child protection
  • Responses to indigenous marginalization
  • Climate change mitigation and adaptation
  • Food sovereignty and security and the politics of food
  • Survival development – including responses to natural disasters and pandemics

Although the book is focused upon community development, scholars engaged in community-oriented research in cognate disciplines are also encouraged to submit an abstract.
Interested?

Please send your 500-word abstract, (including contact details and affiliations) by email to Dr Lynda Shevellar by the 29th May 2015. Email: l.shevellar@uq.edu.au

“‘Race’, Ethnicity and Community Development” – expressions of interest requested

This is for a proposed book, to be edited by Gary Craig and others, on ‘race’, ethnicity and community development for the series Rethinking Community Development, to be published by The Policy Press, a leading UK social and public policy publisher.

At this stage, the title has been accepted as part of the series, and we are seeking short expressions of interest (100 words) to contribute chapters. Once the chapter outlines have been agreed, then a full proposal will be submitted to The Policy Press for review and final acceptance.

The chapters, which can be drawn from anywhere across the world, will be no more than 6000 words long and should address some aspect of how community development works within a context defined by different ethnic groups, cultures and/or religions.

Although many countries have had a mix of ethnic groups within their borders for thousands of years, one of the major social and economic trends of the post Second World War period has been the increasing globalisation of migration. This has led to many countries now having countries in which there is a mix of minority populations alongside a settled majority, all generally defined in terms of their ‘race’ or ethnicity. There has been no publication to date which has addressed the role that community development might play in addressing work across ethnic boundaries.

Contributions might include work of the following kinds:

1. Work within specific minorities (e.g. capacity building or empowerment work)

2. Work with specific types of migrant: (e.g. with refugees, economic migrants or particularly excluded groups such as Gypsies)

3. Work with migrants within specific ‘industrial sectors (e.g. migrant domestic workers)

4. Work between minorities/migrant and majority communities

5. Work in situations of conflict (e.g. interethnic work)

6. Work to assert the rights of First Nations people.

If you are interested in contributing to this publication, please send a note with your organisational affiliation and a summary of the proposed content of the chapter – at this stage no more than 100 words – to gary.craig@durham.ac.uk as soon as possible. He will acknowledge your interest and let you know as soon as possible if he thinks it will fit the proposed publicatio.